Ontario, Ca Pediatric Dentist

A Dental Health Timeline for Children | Kid's Dentist Ontario

Being a parent means taking on the responsibility of your child's welfare. One of the top concerns is children's oral health. Parents spend a great deal of time investigating guidelines, suggestions, and the best kids dentist available in their area. Following a simple dental health timeline gives parents welcome help when dealing with oral hygiene.

 

Children's Oral Health Timeline

 

Pregnancy

Healthy oral hygiene begins before the birth of a baby. Mothers are advised to seek out dental examinations during their pregnancy. Women who are not pregnant, but planning to conceive, should also seek out dental examinations. Visiting the dentist is easily overlooked. However, some dental problems can be dangerous to mother and baby.

 

0-4 Months Old

Good oral hygiene should begin as the baby's gums are preparing to erupt teeth. After each feeding, gently wipe the baby's gums down with a damp cloth. Begin by wiping the gums twice a day with a two or three-second interval between strokes. Soft rubber finger brushes are also available. It is never too early to establish a healthy oral hygiene routine. It will also ensure the gums are free from bacteria for the incoming teeth.

 

4 to 6 Month Old

These are the months when teething begins. Continue wiping down the gums and new teeth. They may be a little sensitive at this point, but continuing with the oral hygiene routine will still be important. Plaque forms on teeth, even newly emerged ones. 

 

This is the time to schedule the baby's first dental appointment. If you don't already have a dentist, then find one that specializes in treating children. Depending on your insurance, check-ups may be scheduled every 6 to twelve months. Avoiding foods with high amounts of citric acid and unnecessary sugar will help prevent plaque development and early enamel loss.

 

One Year Old

This is a milestone age for many reasons. By now, the child should have had his first dentist appointment. Biannual checkups are a normal part of a child's oral hygiene. Regular check-ups not only help with plaque build-up, but they ensure the child's growth and development are on track. 

 

Introduce your child to a soft bristle brush. It is recommended to use fluoride-free toothpaste until the child can spit out the toothpaste from his mouth. It is also acceptable to skip the toothpaste and use plain water for brushing. 

 

As the teeth come in, watch for proximity. Once teeth begin touching sides, introduce your child to flossing. Establish a routine for flossing after every meal. Forming healthy oral habits early can prevent future problems.

 

2 to 3 Years Old

Many parents at this stage break their child's pacifier habit. Dentists recommend that using a pacifier and thumb-sucking could misshape the child's mouth. It could also affect how teeth come in. 

 

By now, parents should have an established routine of helping their child brush and floss their teeth. By age three, most baby teeth will be in. Two times per day is acceptable. However, dentists recommend brushing and flossing after each meal. 

 

3 to 6 Years Old

As children grow they gain more independence in self-care. It is up to the parent to discern when their child will be able to brush and floss correctly and independently. Parents should supervise and assist as needed. Many children have trouble reaching the back of their mouth.

 

Assistance with flossing may still be necessary at this stage of a child's growth. Also, your child should be continuing their bi-annual check-ups. By now, the dentist should have performed the child's first x-ray. The x-ray will help the dentist to determine the child's overall oral health. At this time parents begin to discuss sealers with their hygienists.  

 

6 to 10 Years Old

At this age, your child should be independently brushing and flossing on a regular basis. Their routine should be firmly established. If a parent's supervision is still needed, then brush your teeth with your child. This shows your child the correct method and thoroughness. Not only does this encourage your child, but gives them any needed guidance.

 

Around the age of 7, your dentist may recommend a visit to a children's orthodontist. This will be suggested if there are concerns with oral development. Bi-annual check-ups should continue to monitor the changes as baby teeth transition into adult, permanent teeth. 

 

10 Plus Years

By now the child should be completely able to independently attend to their oral hygiene. Healthy routines and habits are embedded in their daily lives. As your child receives praise, they will take pride in their smile and continue to brush and floss regularly.

 

Somewhere close to age 13, your child's adult teeth should all be in place. Bi-annual check-ups should be continued for monitoring their development and growth. If applicable, major dental problems will be discussed. Your dentist will make recommendations for any corrective procedures needed. If your child hasn't had any previous orthodontic screening, they will now. 

 

Keeping your child in consistent dental care is important for their oral health. Offices such as Kids Dental Specialty, an Ontario children's dentist facility, offers specialized training. Healthy habits for proper oral hygiene, starting in the early years, are important for a lifelong healthy body. 

 


Ontario, Ca Pediatric Dentist

Why Baby Teeth Matter | Ontario Kid's Dentist

Some might think that since baby teeth come out and are followed by adult teeth that it’s less important to tend and care for them than for the adult teeth. This is not true, and there are numerous reasons to be noted regarding the importance of good baby dental care.

Baby teeth are so cute – from the time a baby starts fussing and you see those little teeth breaking through, people love to watch their progress and count the teeth that have come in. Look at a child’s xrays and you’ll see something amazing – the adult teeth lined up right in the path of the baby teeth.

When a child grows baby teeth, the primary use of those teeth is for chewing - and the adult teeth also need a fighting chance to correctly serve that purpose.

Take it from the Tooth Fairy!

Kids start to shed their baby teeth at around 6 years of age. The first baby teeth to go are usually central incisors – otherwise known as the two front teeth. Children’s oral health is key in making sure the teeth and gums are healthy so that the adult mouth and teeth do well in the future.

As the child’s gums may be sensitive because of new teeth, and just generally little guys and girls don’t always cooperate with tooth care, baby tooth care is emphasized less in the early years. Unfortunately, there are many problems that can develop with baby’s teeth. For example, baby bottle tooth decay is caused when the sugars from liquids like, juice, milk and formula remain on the teeth, resulting in development of bacteria, and later, decay of the tooth.

Gums and teeth can also get infected and affect not only the tooth but the soft gum tissue around it, potentially reaching those waiting adult teeth. Also, a child’s tooth decay will cause pain, which can be a problem for the child, for example trying to concentrate in school.

The Health of Tooth Alignment

Children’s tooth alignment is also dependent on taking good care of the baby teeth. The baby tooth acts as a placeholder for the adult tooth, so if a baby tooth falls out early from decay, the adult tooth loses the “path” and can grow in incorrectly. This can cause painful crowding of teeth later on and can also affect a child’s confidence regarding physical appearance in school and with classmates.

Finding the Best Kids Dentist

The mouth is a sensitive area, and it’s tricky to convince a child that someone looking into his mouth is a good thing. It’s important to find a dentist’s office that is good with kids, patient and kind and understanding. Therapy dogs are seen in more and more places these days, and some dentists’ offices are no exception – therapy dogs can go a long way in making children feel more comfortable (and distracted) in an otherwise medical environment.

New Equipment for Children's Dentistry

There is a lot of new equipment that will definitely make children, and therefore their parents, more comfortable, such as the Nomad, a digital x-ray machine that is portable so it can be comfortably used no matter the size of the child or how the child is situated in the dentist’s chair.

Another machine, called a Sopro Life, reduces the need of an x-ray machine, as it consists of is a camera that goes in the mouth and utilizes a light that can detect caries, or cavities. That means the potential for less or no little folded cardboard pieces being put in tender little mouths.

There’s also a dental instrument called the Wand, which can be used to anesthetize a single tooth rather than a larger area – the centralized numbing means that the child will not accidentally bite his lip because he can’t feel it. And another instrument called the Isolite has a special suction so that the examined area will not be contaminated by saliva. The Isolite also helps keep the child’s airway clear during a procedure.

Arguably the best advance in dentistry for kids as well as adults is the Bio-lase, a special laser for pain-free dentistry that can remove a cavity without the use of anesthesia needles or those nightmare-causing grating drill sound and feel, excruciating to adults, and especially to kids.

It is easy to see how baby dental care is so important in the life of your child’s teeth and mouth. These great advances in dental care make it so much easier for a parent to help a child through potentially difficult preventive and proactive care. Finding an Ontario children's dentist that can take care of your child’s teeth and oral health in a kind and patient way will help greatly with the imperative need of childrens oral health.