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A Dental Health Timeline for Children | Kid's Dentist Ontario

Being a parent means taking on the responsibility of your child's welfare. One of the top concerns is children's oral health. Parents spend a great deal of time investigating guidelines, suggestions, and the best kids dentist available in their area. Following a simple dental health timeline gives parents welcome help when dealing with oral hygiene.

 

Children's Oral Health Timeline

 

Pregnancy

Healthy oral hygiene begins before the birth of a baby. Mothers are advised to seek out dental examinations during their pregnancy. Women who are not pregnant, but planning to conceive, should also seek out dental examinations. Visiting the dentist is easily overlooked. However, some dental problems can be dangerous to mother and baby.

 

0-4 Months Old

Good oral hygiene should begin as the baby's gums are preparing to erupt teeth. After each feeding, gently wipe the baby's gums down with a damp cloth. Begin by wiping the gums twice a day with a two or three-second interval between strokes. Soft rubber finger brushes are also available. It is never too early to establish a healthy oral hygiene routine. It will also ensure the gums are free from bacteria for the incoming teeth.

 

4 to 6 Month Old

These are the months when teething begins. Continue wiping down the gums and new teeth. They may be a little sensitive at this point, but continuing with the oral hygiene routine will still be important. Plaque forms on teeth, even newly emerged ones. 

 

This is the time to schedule the baby's first dental appointment. If you don't already have a dentist, then find one that specializes in treating children. Depending on your insurance, check-ups may be scheduled every 6 to twelve months. Avoiding foods with high amounts of citric acid and unnecessary sugar will help prevent plaque development and early enamel loss.

 

One Year Old

This is a milestone age for many reasons. By now, the child should have had his first dentist appointment. Biannual checkups are a normal part of a child's oral hygiene. Regular check-ups not only help with plaque build-up, but they ensure the child's growth and development are on track. 

 

Introduce your child to a soft bristle brush. It is recommended to use fluoride-free toothpaste until the child can spit out the toothpaste from his mouth. It is also acceptable to skip the toothpaste and use plain water for brushing. 

 

As the teeth come in, watch for proximity. Once teeth begin touching sides, introduce your child to flossing. Establish a routine for flossing after every meal. Forming healthy oral habits early can prevent future problems.

 

2 to 3 Years Old

Many parents at this stage break their child's pacifier habit. Dentists recommend that using a pacifier and thumb-sucking could misshape the child's mouth. It could also affect how teeth come in. 

 

By now, parents should have an established routine of helping their child brush and floss their teeth. By age three, most baby teeth will be in. Two times per day is acceptable. However, dentists recommend brushing and flossing after each meal. 

 

3 to 6 Years Old

As children grow they gain more independence in self-care. It is up to the parent to discern when their child will be able to brush and floss correctly and independently. Parents should supervise and assist as needed. Many children have trouble reaching the back of their mouth.

 

Assistance with flossing may still be necessary at this stage of a child's growth. Also, your child should be continuing their bi-annual check-ups. By now, the dentist should have performed the child's first x-ray. The x-ray will help the dentist to determine the child's overall oral health. At this time parents begin to discuss sealers with their hygienists.  

 

6 to 10 Years Old

At this age, your child should be independently brushing and flossing on a regular basis. Their routine should be firmly established. If a parent's supervision is still needed, then brush your teeth with your child. This shows your child the correct method and thoroughness. Not only does this encourage your child, but gives them any needed guidance.

 

Around the age of 7, your dentist may recommend a visit to a children's orthodontist. This will be suggested if there are concerns with oral development. Bi-annual check-ups should continue to monitor the changes as baby teeth transition into adult, permanent teeth. 

 

10 Plus Years

By now the child should be completely able to independently attend to their oral hygiene. Healthy routines and habits are embedded in their daily lives. As your child receives praise, they will take pride in their smile and continue to brush and floss regularly.

 

Somewhere close to age 13, your child's adult teeth should all be in place. Bi-annual check-ups should be continued for monitoring their development and growth. If applicable, major dental problems will be discussed. Your dentist will make recommendations for any corrective procedures needed. If your child hasn't had any previous orthodontic screening, they will now. 

 

Keeping your child in consistent dental care is important for their oral health. Offices such as Kids Dental Specialty, an Ontario children's dentist facility, offers specialized training. Healthy habits for proper oral hygiene, starting in the early years, are important for a lifelong healthy body. 

 


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Five Reasons Why Your Teenager Should Still See a Children's Dentist | Ontario Kid's Dentist

There are several reasons why your teenager should see a children's dentist. Parents are often going to rely on their dentist to make sure that their child has the best oral health. A children's dentist will be able to do all of the examinations, cleanings, and restorations for your teenager when they are needed, much like a family dentist. However, a children's dentist will provide specialized treatment for your teenager at every visit. Every teenager deserves to have the specialized attention that they are going to get from a children's dentist. 

 

Teenagers are Still Growing

The first reason for the teenager dental care is that the children's dentist is trained to treat teeth that are still developing, along with their gums. This means that they are going to have all of the skills and knowledge that is necessary to handle the issues that can threaten the dental health of a teenager. By visiting a children's dentist, they can treat tooth decay, cavities, over-retained baby teeth, and any other oral health issues that could be affecting your teenager. They are also going to have the experience of how to treat the teenager and his or her wisdom teeth. The children's dentist will be qualified to sedate your teenager if during an intense dental treatment or procedure.

 

Specialized Care for Your Teen

The second reason for taking your teenager to the children's dentist is that the dentist is going to have the ability to tailor the care based on the needs of the teenager. The dental care will be tailored to how your teenager's teeth are developing. The children's dentist will know how to make sure that the teenager has good oral health habits, especially as they get older. When you take your child to a children's dentist, then they will be able to set the stage for a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

 

Keeping Your Teen Calm

The third reason for a children's dentist for teens is that they will be adept at keeping the teenager calm during any type of dental procedure or treatment. Most of the time, the teenager is not going to want to go to the dentist at all, but because these dentists are different than a regular dentist, then they are going to know what the teenager might be fearful or nervous about. A children's dentist knows how to approach the teenager so that the teenager is going to be as calm as possible during their treatment plan. This means that the teenager will have a drama-free and happy trip to see the dentist. If the dentist approaches this the right way, then the teenager is going to look forward to going to the dentist instead of regretting it every time. This is not the type of reaction that a teenager is going to give if they have a visit with a regular dentist.

 

Dental Care Counselor

The fourth reason for making an appointment with a children's dentist is that they are going to be a dental care counselor for your teenager. This is especially true if the teenager has any bad habits, such as grinding his or her teeth. It is going to be a lot harder than you might think to try to break your child of this type of habit. A children's dentist is going to be up to the challenge. The dentist is going to sit down with the child so that they can teach them how these types of bad habits are going to harm their teeth in the future. They will also offer assistance on how they can stop the habit.

 

Children's Dental Equipment

The fifth reason for a children's dentist for teens is that a children's dentist is going to have the special dental equipment that the teenager is going to need for their teeth. When you try to take your child to a regular dentist, they are going to have regular size dental instruments that are could be too big for your teenager's mouth. When you take your child to a children's dentist, then all of the dental equipment is going to be smaller, which is more likely to fit in the teenager's mouth. In addition, the children's dentist is going to know the best ways to ease the fears of the teenager and how to introduce him or her to the dental instruments.

 

There are many benefits of making an appointment at a children's dentist for your teenager. Your teenager is still growing, and a children's dentist is going to provide specialized care for this stage in your child’s life.